Mint fibre

mint fibreAlthough there’s still plenty of fibre in the stash, I had to try this. Just believe the ads when they say that it doesn’t actually smell of mint.

So what is it, then? Some retailers describe it as rayon, whereas others say “cellulose-based”. Tomayto/tomartoe, but I think I prefer the latter as it doesn’t bring to mind shinymint spindle2, clingy things from past decades, or the fabric seller in Ecuador who once tried to flog me some as “silk” then after a nonchalant stare from me, added “seda de rayĆ³n…”

And the mint? Mint-infused.

One source described it as being similar to soysilk, but I found it more like real silk to handle and in appearance. From what I remember, tmint yarn2he soysilk (and it was a few years ago) had more drape and less loft. The mint fibre, however, opened itself from the tops and spun finely with no great difficulty. The yarn actually has some stretch to it, too, quite a bit. I haven’t made anything with it yet, or tried dyeing it, but will see how it goes as weft. It certainly has the look and feel of silk. I reckon the fibre would blend well with wool, too.

 

 

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Cotton

I finally got to the end of a bag of cotton roving that had been sitting in the cupboard, waiting to be scotton1pun. Perhaps it was waiting the arrival of the penny tahkli? I wanted to get some slubbiness to the yarn, so left lumps and bumps in it at regular intervals. The trouble is, more practice = less character to the yarn. During a recent alpaca spinning workshop at the Guild, I quoted the English comedian Les Dawson and his signature act of playing the piano with carefully placed “wrong” notes. He explained during an interview that you had to be good at playing the piano before you could be intentionally bad. In spinning terms, I guess that explains the difference between a beginner’s yarn and an art yarn. Nevertheless, yours truly shall continue to practise being intentionally bad.

As you can see, I spun as much cotton as would fit on the tahkli. Just the “feel” of it told me that any more fibre wasn’t an option as the spinning slowed and became more “cumbersome”. Then, this weekend just passed, I found an olive bowl – just the right width and length to accommodate the tahkli in resting mode.

Spindles

Instead of a snow dome with Big Ben and a Royal Guard, the souvenirs turkishof my recent holiday in England were all fibre-related. I bought a small Turkish spindle from IST Crafts last year and found it a dream to spin fine yarns with, especially yak down and ahimsa silk. This year I decided to get a larger one for spinning sock yarns and the like. The choice was simple: bog oak. After all, who could resist wood from one’s birth country’s national tree, especially when the wood is about 5,000 years old? Easy. The brass weights at the ends of the arms are a bonus.

I’m still getting used to larger Turkish spindles, as I’ve found the ratio of initial spin to spindle size as the latter increases is different to that of round, top whorl spindles. However, it’s all good and the spindle has already produced a couple of balls of 4-ply equivalent Finnish Humbug.

tahkli

I also took the opportunity (combined postage cost) to get an IST penny tahkli. The fact that the coin is dated with my birth year was the icing on the cake. I should add here that I’m only just pre-decimal. Anyway, this one, too, is a pleasure to use and I look forward to comparing results with a fellow Guild member who also has one.

Autumn beanie

autumnbeanieSomeone pointed out that this could very well be the colours of a hitherto-unknown footie team. Better not wear it down the Port, then. Or to a quidditch match.

It was actually a thank-you for the many kilos of dahlia flowers mentioned in a previous post. I had some balls from a grey, crossbreed fleece spun many moons ago that had already made one serviceable beanie, so I decided to put the rest of that part of the never-decreasing stash to good use.

The yarn was over-dyed with dahlia flowers (orange) modified with bicarb, and dried Tagetes minuta tops. I think I prefer these particular colours on white yarn, but after the workshop surprises, I might just do my next lot of natural dyeing at the Guild. There’s magic in them there pipes…

Spinning the Tukidale I

This is definitely a fleece that prefers combing, and spinning from the bottom of the staple in the grease. Flickispinning tukidaleng didn’t work, as at the bottom end there are a lot of shorter, finer fibres. With combing, I was able to remove these and set them aside to see what they spin up like. I’ll probably scour them and then put them through the wool combs.

I did scour a couple of lots of uncombed staples prior to spinning, but due to the high micron count, leaving the grease in is kinder on the hands (and everything else). I have yet to decide how to tackle these.

Back to the combed staples. The longer fibres were etukidaleIIasy to manage, and quick to spin and ply. The resulting yarn is quite pleasing for a first attempt – definitely too coarse for much other than a carpet, but still with a degree of softness. After scouring the skein, it came out whiter than white. I look forward to seeing how well it takes dye.

The next step is to spin some singles for warp. As the total fleece weight was 2.7Kg, there should be enough to experiment with.

Tukidale

Tukidale is just one of the many sheep breeds I’d read about in The Fleece and Fiber Sourcebook – a publication that should come with an addiction-warning. After some research into which interesting fibres I could either find locally or import legally, I was amazed to find there is a Tukidale breeder in South Australia. Not only that, buttukidale less than 10km from home.

I couldn’t pass up this opportunity to try a “carpet wool” for myself, and perhaps introduce it to fellow Guild members. There must be some interest in a hard-wearing yarn for bags, rugs, tapestries, etc?

A short drive along one of those winding, Hills roads (a careful-what-you-have-for-breakfast-and-don’t-read-anything-if-you’re-a-passenger road) I was lucky enough to get the last fleece they had, although could have waited (eagerly) until the next shearing in September. I also learnt heaps about the breed in a very short time.

With long staples, minimal dirt and a large micron, this should be easy to clean. Spinning will be another matter; there doesn’t seem to be any information online about this particular breed, although some pictures of Scottish Blackface appear similar. Just have to get on and spin some…